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Was not born into a Quaker family. Baker's parents were staunch Methodists.

Was called Daddy by all those close to him including his masons, workers

Could write and draw with both hands

Had an inimitable and irreverent sense of humour

Has designed and built a dance village, computer institutes, fishermen’s huts, chapels and churches, factories, schools, film studios, orphanages, tourist resorts, residences, technical institutes, earthquake and tsunami resistant houses, leprosy homes, a Literacy Village,hostels, slum dwellings improvement, an ornithology centre, government buildings, a blind children’s international school and a museum.

Didn’t have an office. His handbag and his self-made diary were his mobile office. A corner of the bedroom was his ‘formal’ office.

Never employed draftsmen and other staff to keep unnecessary costs for clients down

He always went on the site and worked alongside his masons.

Raised issues such as water harvesting, sustainable architecture much before it came into the general public consciousness

Couldn'’t speak Malayalam well at all so used to draw and explain things to his workmen and masons

A testament to his frugality, Baker was often seen rummaging through salvage heaps looking for suitable building materials, door and window frames

Pacifist in all respects. Did not believe in violence in any form

Socially responsible citizen: Baker often wrote letters to newspapers and authorities on various public issues

Drew an entire volume of cartoons on hospitals and the medical profession while he was recuperating from major surgery

Was fascinated by all the jargon used in computers. Drew another series of cartoons on these computer acronyms

Always reused paper: used old envelopes and waste paper for his work whenever possible

Had two brothers, Leonard and Norman and a sister Edna

In his later years, created a vast collection of mango designs, each one unique